HONOLULU (AP) — EDITOR'S NOTE – On Dec. 7, 1941, as Japanese bombs rained down on Pearl Harbor, The Associated Press' chief of bureau in Honolulu, Eugene Burns, was unable to get out the urgent news of the historic attack that would draw the U.S. into World War II. The military had already taken control of all communication lines, so Burns was left without a line to the outside world. In Washington, AP editor William Peacock and staff got word of the attack from President …